Bayer Low Dose "Baby" Aspirin Pain Reliever, 81mg Enteric Coated Tablets - 200 ea

BAYER CORP/CONS HEALTH $10.99

Bayer Low Dose "Baby" Aspirin Pain Reliever

Description:

  • Often Recommended as "Baby" Aspirin by Doctors for Adult Aspirin Regimen Use
  • Small, easy-to-swallow tablets
  • Protects your heart by keeping your blood flowing freely
  • Safety coated for added stomach protection
  • For the temporary relief of minor aches, pains and headaches.
  • Because of its delayed action, this product will not provide fast relief of headaches or other symptoms needing immediate relief. 
  • Ask your doctor about other uses for Bayer Safety Coated 81 mg Aspirin.

Active Ingredients: Aspirin (81mg) (Pain Reliever/Fever Reducer)

Inactive Ingredients: Black Iron Oxide (CI 77499), Brown Iron Oxide, Carnauba (Copernicia Cerifera) Wax, Corn Starch, Croscarmellose Sodium, D&C Yellow 10 Aluminum Lake, FD&C Yellow 6 Aluminum Lake, Hypromellose, Lactose Monohydrate, Methacrylic Acid Copolymer, Microcrystalline Cellulose, Polysorbate 80, Cellulose (Powdered), Pregelatinized Starch, Propylene Glycol, Shellac, Sodium Lauryl Sulfate, Titanium Dioxide, Triacetin, Triethyl Citrate

Directions:
●  drink a full glass of water with each dose
●  adults and children 12 years and over: take 4 to 8 tablets every 4 hours not to exceed 48 tablets in 24 hours unless directed by a doctor
●  children under 12 years: consult a doctor

Warnings:
Reye’s syndrome:  

  • Children and teenagers who have or are recovering from chicken pox or flu-like symptoms should not use this product.  When using this product, if changes in behavior with nausea and vomiting occur, consult a doctor
  • because these symptoms could be an early sign of Reye’s syndrome, a rare but serious illness.
  • Allergy alert:
  • Aspirin may cause a severe allergic reaction which may include:·hives·facial swelling·asthma (wheezing)·shock

Stomach bleeding warning:

  • This product contains an NSAID, which may cause severe stomach bleeding.  The chance is higher if you are age 60 or older
  • have had stomach ulcers or bleeding problems
  • take a blood thinning (anticoagulant) or steroid drug
  • take other drugs containing prescription or nonprescription NSAIDs(aspirin, ibuprofen, naproxen, or others)
  • have 3 or more alcoholic drinks every day while using this product.

Customer Questions and Answers:

Q1. Is aspirin safe for your patients?

  • For most patients, aspirin is safe when used as directed. But for some, aspirin can cause adverse effects — some of which can be serious, such as gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding or other bleeding. These serious events are rare and usually related to long-term use of high-dose aspirin beyond traditional over-the-counter use.
  • Monitor your patients' long-term use of aspirin, including when prescribing:
  • An aspirin regimen for recurrent myocardial infarction (MI) or ischemic stroke prevention
  • Aspirin use longer than 10 days for pain
  • Aspirin use longer than 3 days for fever

Q2. Which patients should take aspirin for recurrent myocardial infarction (MI) prevention?

  • The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the use of aspirin to reduce the risk of MI and stroke in men and women who have had a previous event. Aspirin is not appropriate for everyone, and benefits and risks should be discussed with your patients before they begin an aspirin regimen.
  • Aspirin therapy may be appropriate for patients who have 1 or more of the following conditions:
  • Previous MI
  • A previous ischemic stroke or a transient ischemic attack
  • Unstable or stable angina
  • Certain heart procedures, such as angioplasty or coronary bypass surgery

Q3. Patients with certain conditions or taking certain medications should avoid aspirin. Long-term aspirin use may increase or prolong gastrointestinal bleeding and stomach ulcers. For more information, see Which patients should avoid taking aspirin?

  • What is the recommended dose for recurrent myocardial infarction (MI) prevention?
  • For recurrent MI prevention, the FDA has approved the use of low-dose aspirin (75 mg to 325 mg). Research suggests that lower doses may reduce potential adverse effects while maintaining efficacy. Aspirin is not appropriate for everyone, and benefits and risks should be discussed with your patients before they begin an aspirin regimen.

Q4. What are the possible adverse effects of long-term aspirin use?

  • Adverse effects associated with long-term aspirin use include increased or prolonged gastrointestinal bleeding and stomach ulcers. For most patients, long-term aspirin use is safe when directed and monitored by a physician.

Q5. Can aspirin prevent all kinds of strokes?

  • An aspirin regimen may help prevent a second ischemic stroke but will not prevent hemorrhagic strokes. In fact, aspirin use slightly increases the risk of hemorrhagic stroke. If your patients have a history of stroke, discuss these risks before recommending an aspirin regimen.

Q6. Which patients should avoid taking aspirin?

  • In general, an aspirin regimen may not be appropriate for patients who have:
  • An allergy to aspirin, other salicylates, or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs
  • Asthma
  • Stomach ulcers or a history of ulcers
  • Inherited bleeding disorders (hemophilia) or acquired bleeding disorders (liver disease or vitamin K deficiency)
  • A history of hemorrhagic stroke
  • Reduced liver or kidney function
  • Uncontrolled high blood pressure
  • Ask your patients if they have 3 or more alcoholic drinks per day. This increases the risk of GI bleeding.
  • It's important to discuss all of your patients' prescription and nonprescription medications before beginning an aspirin regimen to prevent adverse drug interactions. Long-term aspirin use may increase or prolong gastrointestinal bleeding and stomach ulcers.

Q7.If a patient is on an aspirin regimen, can he or she take aspirin for pain?

  • Yes. Patients on an aspirin regimen can take additional aspirin for occasional pain such as headaches, muscle aches, fever, or minor arthritis pain. The total maximum daily dose should not exceed 4000 mg. Each dose should be taken in accordance with label directions.

Q8. What is the maximum daily dose of aspirin?

  • The total maximum daily dose of aspirin should not exceed 4000 mg. Each dose should be taken in accordance with label directions.

Q9. How can my patients reduce their risk of cardiovascular (CV) disease?

  • Patients can reduce their risk of recurrent myocardial infarction (MI) and ischemic stroke by engaging in a healthier lifestyle. You can discuss the many ways they can reduce high blood pressure and high blood cholesterol, including the benefits of quitting smoking, maintaining a healthy weight, and exercising.

Note: Image and Description may vary from actual product due to Continuous manufacturer Product updates. We recommend that you do not rely solely on the information presented and that you always read labels, warnings, and directions before using or consuming a product

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Description

Bayer Low Dose "Baby" Aspirin Pain Reliever

Description:

  • Often Recommended as "Baby" Aspirin by Doctors for Adult Aspirin Regimen Use
  • Small, easy-to-swallow tablets
  • Protects your heart by keeping your blood flowing freely
  • Safety coated for added stomach protection
  • For the temporary relief of minor aches, pains and headaches.
  • Because of its delayed action, this product will not provide fast relief of headaches or other symptoms needing immediate relief. 
  • Ask your doctor about other uses for Bayer Safety Coated 81 mg Aspirin.

Active Ingredients: Aspirin (81mg) (Pain Reliever/Fever Reducer)

Inactive Ingredients: Black Iron Oxide (CI 77499), Brown Iron Oxide, Carnauba (Copernicia Cerifera) Wax, Corn Starch, Croscarmellose Sodium, D&C Yellow 10 Aluminum Lake, FD&C Yellow 6 Aluminum Lake, Hypromellose, Lactose Monohydrate, Methacrylic Acid Copolymer, Microcrystalline Cellulose, Polysorbate 80, Cellulose (Powdered), Pregelatinized Starch, Propylene Glycol, Shellac, Sodium Lauryl Sulfate, Titanium Dioxide, Triacetin, Triethyl Citrate

Directions:
●  drink a full glass of water with each dose
●  adults and children 12 years and over: take 4 to 8 tablets every 4 hours not to exceed 48 tablets in 24 hours unless directed by a doctor
●  children under 12 years: consult a doctor

Warnings:
Reye’s syndrome:  

  • Children and teenagers who have or are recovering from chicken pox or flu-like symptoms should not use this product.  When using this product, if changes in behavior with nausea and vomiting occur, consult a doctor
  • because these symptoms could be an early sign of Reye’s syndrome, a rare but serious illness.
  • Allergy alert:
  • Aspirin may cause a severe allergic reaction which may include:·hives·facial swelling·asthma (wheezing)·shock

Stomach bleeding warning:

  • This product contains an NSAID, which may cause severe stomach bleeding.  The chance is higher if you are age 60 or older
  • have had stomach ulcers or bleeding problems
  • take a blood thinning (anticoagulant) or steroid drug
  • take other drugs containing prescription or nonprescription NSAIDs(aspirin, ibuprofen, naproxen, or others)
  • have 3 or more alcoholic drinks every day while using this product.

Customer Questions and Answers:

Q1. Is aspirin safe for your patients?

  • For most patients, aspirin is safe when used as directed. But for some, aspirin can cause adverse effects — some of which can be serious, such as gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding or other bleeding. These serious events are rare and usually related to long-term use of high-dose aspirin beyond traditional over-the-counter use.
  • Monitor your patients' long-term use of aspirin, including when prescribing:
  • An aspirin regimen for recurrent myocardial infarction (MI) or ischemic stroke prevention
  • Aspirin use longer than 10 days for pain
  • Aspirin use longer than 3 days for fever

Q2. Which patients should take aspirin for recurrent myocardial infarction (MI) prevention?

  • The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the use of aspirin to reduce the risk of MI and stroke in men and women who have had a previous event. Aspirin is not appropriate for everyone, and benefits and risks should be discussed with your patients before they begin an aspirin regimen.
  • Aspirin therapy may be appropriate for patients who have 1 or more of the following conditions:
  • Previous MI
  • A previous ischemic stroke or a transient ischemic attack
  • Unstable or stable angina
  • Certain heart procedures, such as angioplasty or coronary bypass surgery

Q3. Patients with certain conditions or taking certain medications should avoid aspirin. Long-term aspirin use may increase or prolong gastrointestinal bleeding and stomach ulcers. For more information, see Which patients should avoid taking aspirin?

  • What is the recommended dose for recurrent myocardial infarction (MI) prevention?
  • For recurrent MI prevention, the FDA has approved the use of low-dose aspirin (75 mg to 325 mg). Research suggests that lower doses may reduce potential adverse effects while maintaining efficacy. Aspirin is not appropriate for everyone, and benefits and risks should be discussed with your patients before they begin an aspirin regimen.

Q4. What are the possible adverse effects of long-term aspirin use?

  • Adverse effects associated with long-term aspirin use include increased or prolonged gastrointestinal bleeding and stomach ulcers. For most patients, long-term aspirin use is safe when directed and monitored by a physician.

Q5. Can aspirin prevent all kinds of strokes?

  • An aspirin regimen may help prevent a second ischemic stroke but will not prevent hemorrhagic strokes. In fact, aspirin use slightly increases the risk of hemorrhagic stroke. If your patients have a history of stroke, discuss these risks before recommending an aspirin regimen.

Q6. Which patients should avoid taking aspirin?

  • In general, an aspirin regimen may not be appropriate for patients who have:
  • An allergy to aspirin, other salicylates, or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs
  • Asthma
  • Stomach ulcers or a history of ulcers
  • Inherited bleeding disorders (hemophilia) or acquired bleeding disorders (liver disease or vitamin K deficiency)
  • A history of hemorrhagic stroke
  • Reduced liver or kidney function
  • Uncontrolled high blood pressure
  • Ask your patients if they have 3 or more alcoholic drinks per day. This increases the risk of GI bleeding.
  • It's important to discuss all of your patients' prescription and nonprescription medications before beginning an aspirin regimen to prevent adverse drug interactions. Long-term aspirin use may increase or prolong gastrointestinal bleeding and stomach ulcers.

Q7.If a patient is on an aspirin regimen, can he or she take aspirin for pain?

  • Yes. Patients on an aspirin regimen can take additional aspirin for occasional pain such as headaches, muscle aches, fever, or minor arthritis pain. The total maximum daily dose should not exceed 4000 mg. Each dose should be taken in accordance with label directions.

Q8. What is the maximum daily dose of aspirin?

  • The total maximum daily dose of aspirin should not exceed 4000 mg. Each dose should be taken in accordance with label directions.

Q9. How can my patients reduce their risk of cardiovascular (CV) disease?

  • Patients can reduce their risk of recurrent myocardial infarction (MI) and ischemic stroke by engaging in a healthier lifestyle. You can discuss the many ways they can reduce high blood pressure and high blood cholesterol, including the benefits of quitting smoking, maintaining a healthy weight, and exercising.

Note: Image and Description may vary from actual product due to Continuous manufacturer Product updates. We recommend that you do not rely solely on the information presented and that you always read labels, warnings, and directions before using or consuming a product

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Additional info

SKU: 262022
UPC: 3-12843-53640-1
Width: 4.00
Height: 4.00
Depth: 4.00
Shipping: Calculated at Checkout